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Memorandum Reports

Report that covers interim results during the course of a project. Note: Unless linked to the full text, reports are only available to NATO member nations from designated distribution centres.

Documents

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Waterside Security 2010 (WSS2010) Conference: Post Conference Report Waterside Security 2010 (WSS2010) Conference: Post Conference Report

Date added: 02/01/2011
Date modified: 06/08/2012
Filesize: 1.43 MB

Waterside Security 2010 (WSS2010) Conference: Post Conference Report. Kessel, R.; Zakharia, M. NURC-MR-2011-002. February 2011

The 2nd International Conference on Waterside Security was hosted by NURC, Carrara, Italy, 3-5 November 2010. This report provides summary statistics of the conference, a summary of the workshops, remarks form the WSS2010 Chairman (Ronald Kessel), and acknowledges key contributors.

Validation of the Goal-Oriented Decision Support System in the context of counter-piracy interdiction operations in the Indian Ocean Validation of the Goal-Oriented Decision Support System in the context of counter-piracy interdiction operations in the Indian Ocean

Date added: 12/23/2015
Date modified: 12/23/2015
Filesize: Unknown

Validation of the Goal-Oriented Decision Support System in the context of counter-piracy interdiction operations in the Indian Ocean. Bourque, François-Alex. CMRE-MR-2015-016. December 2015.

In an effort to address the problem of conducting counter-piracy interdiction operations in the Indian Ocean, the NATO Science and Technology (STO) Centre for Maritime Research and Experimentation (CMRE) developed the Goal-Oriented Decision Support System (GO-DSS). Within that specific operational context, this contribution validates the approach used in the GO-DSS focusing on two core elements of its methodology, namely the risk forecasts used as input and the evolutionary vessel routing algorithm implemented in the Optimal Asset Allocator (OAA). Part of the GO-DSS design philosophy being predicated on environmentally forecast risk of piracy, the spatio-temporal characteristics of these risk maps is explored and conclusions are drawn in regards to the validity of the spatial variability observed and of the concept of risk as a time-varying quantity. A comparative performance analysis is then conducted pitting the OAA against two alternatives: a placement strategy where vessels do not stray throughout the planning horizon and a greedy approach for vessel routing with identical initial conditions. Comparing the performance between all three models then allows us to address the question of the validity of the OAA?s vessel routing algorithm, another tenet of the GO-DSS approach, at least within the specific context of counter-piracy interdiction operations in the Indian Ocean. A general discussion on the usefulness of routing within this context is, however, left as a future effort.

Validation and forecast skill evaluation with different categories of rapid environmental assessment data: the NOMR12 experiment Validation and forecast skill evaluation with different categories of rapid environmental assessment data: the NOMR12 experiment

Date added: 12/17/2014
Date modified: 12/17/2014
Filesize: Unknown

Validation and forecast skill evaluation with different categories of rapid environmental assessment data: the NOMR12 experiment.  Russo, Aniello; Onken, Reiner. CMRE-MR-2014-012. December 2014.

In November 2012, the CMRE vessel N/RV Alliance and a fleet of gliders participated in the "Noble Mariner 2012" (NOMR12) exercise, including the conduct of Rapid Environmental Assessment (REA). CMRE provided, demonstrated, and compared the use of Category II (conventional survey ship-based assets) and Category III (autonomous underwater vehicle - gliders) REA assets and techniques. This report concerns one of the main objectives of the sea trial, i.e. the comparison of forecast skills using: Cat I REA (climatology, historical data, existing model products); Cat I to Cat II REA (high resolution model in the area of interest); Cat II REA (ship-based observations); and Cat III REA (glider-based observations), exploited via synoptic oceanographic analysis, and by data assimilation into a high resolution ocean model. The first part of the report concerns context, methods, characterization of the area and comparison of forecasts by different models. The second part addresses the validation of the models and the forecast skills. High resolution models provided a detailed picture of spatial variability of military oceanography parameters (thermohaline and current fields, depth the of sound channel, mixed layer depth), demonstrating in terms of root mean square error (rmse) clearly better capabilities than climatology, but not better than the available operational model. Nevertheless an unsatisfactory rmse, continuous assimilation of glider data into the high resolution model provided a good forecasting skill. This fact suggests that a mixed approach (initialization from Cat II REA and subsequent assimilation of glider data) could provide the best results for the specific case study. A more general indication is that sampling and assimilation techniques would need improvements in order to get relevant advantages in tactical predictions from glider observations.

Using the Multistatic Tactical Planning Aid (MSTPA) for real time decision support during 2014 Using the Multistatic Tactical Planning Aid (MSTPA) for real time decision support during 2014

Date added: 10/07/2015
Date modified: 10/07/2015
Filesize: Unknown

Using the Multistatic Tactical Planning Aid (MSTPA) for real time decision support during 2014.  Strode, Christopher. CMRE-MR-2015-005. April 2015.

The Multistatic Tactical Planning Aid (MSTPA) has been in development at CMRE since 2005. The software has become a powerful and flexible ASW decision support tool which may be used for simulation, real time analysis, and post exercise reconstruction of both monostatic and multistatic ASW scenarios. This progress report documents the use of MSTPA during 2014 for real time decision support, and includes deployments at sea in both scientific experiments and NATO exercises.

Underwater acoustic source positioning using a small fleet of underwater gliders equipped with acoustic payload Underwater acoustic source positioning using a small fleet of underwater gliders equipped with acoustic payload

Date added: 06/16/2016
Date modified: 06/16/2016
Filesize: Unknown

Underwater acoustic source positioning using a small fleet of underwater gliders equipped with acoustic payload. Jiang, Yon-Ming, Garau Pujol, Bartolomé. CMRE-MR-2016-003. April 2016.

During the GLISTEN15 (Glider sensors and payloads for tactical characterization of the environment 2015) sea trial, which was conducted North of Elba Italy from 26 August to 09 September 2015, three omni-directional hydrophone-equipped gliders with reactive behaviour capability were deployed as a small glider network for testing its capabilities for maritime acoustic ISR. This report investigates the feasibility of using the fleet of three gliders to localize the signal of interest underwater by means of passive sensing. Two types of source localization algorithms, linearized and nonlinear, were developed and presented in this report. It is identified during the research that the linearized algorithm is suitable for being implemented in gliders for on board processing and for problems in a simple environment, and the nonlinear approach is capable of localizing the signal of interest in all environmental conditions but becomes more computationally demanding. Simulation and preliminary real data analysis showed that it is feasible to localize an acoustic source over 10 km away using a fleet of three gliders. Moreover, simulation results suggested that the algorithms required relative high precision of travel time measurements and also low inconsistency in the data acquisition systems between any two gliders. Hence it is concluded that better synchronization and consistency in data acquisition system of the glider fleet is crucial for applying the algorithms presented in this work to real world data. Further uncertainty analysis should be carried out to understand the quantified requirements, in travel time and glider positions, of the glider system.

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